add to wish list | library


13 of 28 recommend this,
would you recommend it?

yes | no

CDJapan

Reviews: Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 - Karajan (1976)

start discussion

Reviews: 8
add review

Site review by Polly Nomial April 18, 2005
Performance:   
How to review this recording? It's very tricky and provoked mixed reactions for me whilst listening.

Personally, I find this recording to be a supreme example of the "old school" in Beethoven playing and conducting: superbly rich & polished playing/singing without a hint of roughness. That is *not* to say that there aren't accents or the like but that they are executed with the same care and tenderness as awarded to the pianissimo entries. The recording has something to do with this effect too (more of which later).

Throughout the playing is sustained in all sections of the orchestra and immaculately phrased. Karajan's pacing is logical, steady (but not slow) and unerring throughout and the climaxes are built relentlessly to towering fortissimos, especially in the first movement (you really hear where Bruckner's 9th comes from!) In the second movement the playing is fleet-of-foot and here, I find that the recording is guilty of "smoothing" some accents a little. The slow movement is simply and beautifully played without too much romantic phrasing being evident. The finale has moments when it appears a bit sluggish by modern standards but is well played. The orchestral playing is committed and biting throughout (the orchestral declamation just before the entrance of the tenor is particularly exciting). The soloists are well matched and clearly fit well with Karajan's conception. However, the chorus is large and hence seem to make rather heavy weather of the faster moments. At the very end, the coda finishes in a blaze that, in other works, Karajan seemed reluctant to allow his forces to display. In short, a highly recommendable version of this masterpiece although the new Del Mar texts require anyone seriously interested in Beethoven's original thoughts to seek one of Haitink's (Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 - Haitink) or Vänskä's (Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 - Vänskä) accounts.

The recording itself though is highly controversial. I find that the acoustic of the Philharmonie is fairly well reproduced, as is the glorious but steely tone of the BPO. However, the sound seems to be at once distant (robbing the strings of some bite and damping the accents) and close (giving at times, a very congested sound - particularly during the choral forte's). In some ways I'd like to give the sound 4-4.5 stars as the BPO actually sound like the BPO but equally I'd like to give 0.5-1 stars for the way that the accents are smoothed over (even though one can hear the instrumentalists playing them in the timbre produced). I'll leave it blank! (I wouldn't want to put anyone off from getting this recording if they are on the look out for an "old school" performance - just be advised that some of the sound quality is more than a little strange & so not a demo disc.)

(Purchased)

Copyright © 2005 John Broggio and SA-CD.net

Review by peteyspambucket July 21, 2003 (1 of 4 found this review helpful)
Performance:   Sonics:
I had great expectations for this recording. I thought for sure that SACD would unlock the details from the recording masters of this performance, but no dice. This has to be one of the worst SACDs I've heard. It sounds like it came from a bad cassette. The strings sound very tinny, and the voices in the last movement have a digital sheen all over them.

From the performance standpoint, this was always a very nice recording, but I preferred Karajan's later recording of this. If any of the DG Bohm or DG Bernstein recordings of the 9th come out, they would be more interesting than this one.

Wait for a better recording of the 9th to be released, and skip this one. I'm hoping DG gets better with SACD because they have an enormous catalog of awesome recordings that need to be released on SACD.

Was this review helpful to you?  yes | no

Review by tfkaudio January 16, 2004 (3 of 8 found this review helpful)
Performance:   Sonics:
Add one more 1 star rating. The SACD sound is no better than CD. The performance is a classic, but really a disappointing SACD.

Was this review helpful to you?  yes | no

Review by WalterM May 6, 2004 (4 of 6 found this review helpful)
Performance:   Sonics:
A classic performance with 1976 sound. I thought the sonics were better than the previous reviewers. I listened with low expectations but was pleasently surprised. Better sonics than the CD.

Reviewed in Multichannel format

Was this review helpful to you?  yes | no

Review by beas April 17, 2005 (2 of 5 found this review helpful)
Performance:   Sonics:
I must say I was very dissapointed with the sound stage produced by this disc. I certainly agree with other reviewers,look for another recording.At$44Aus this could be a very expensive waste of money,lukilly I paid less than half of this.

Was this review helpful to you?  yes | no

Review by putmess February 1, 2007 (3 of 8 found this review helpful)
Performance:   Sonics:  
A really disappointing SACD (stereo mode).
Very high sharp peaks, poor low tones, flat with screaming sound.
Some normal CDs sound better.
Re-sell on ebay and still regretting...

Was this review helpful to you?  yes | no

Review by hiredfox April 4, 2009 (4 of 9 found this review helpful)
Performance:   Sonics:  
This was a legendary recording when it first appeared with the Adagio spotlighted for it's achingly beautiful string playing.

What went wrong in the transfer? Patently this does not sound in any way like a SACD and even the performance has been diminished by whatever re-processing has been done.

Deeply disappointing and uninvolving, a poor buy by any standards.

Was this review helpful to you?  yes | no

Review by Joseph Ponessa October 17, 2013 (5 of 5 found this review helpful)
Performance:   Sonics:    
I have received my first two classical Universal BD-A's and am not impressed. The main characteristic of Karajan's Beethoven Ninth and Kaufmann's Wagner album is that they are loud. Kaufmann is so loud that it sounds like the microphones were placed on his epiglottis. He may be singing Siegfried, but he sounds more like the Dragon. I do not have a CD of that album with which to compare, but I can make some comparisons of the Beethoven, which I have owned on LP, CD, CD box set, SACD and now BD-A.
The LP is acclaimed as one of the finest presentations of the Ninth Symphony ever. Although I recently dispossessed myself of 90% of my LPs, I could not part with the Karajan Beethoven cycle from the 1970's. Not only is the vinyl well pressed, the enclosed glossy booklet has fine articles along with a listing of all the members of the Berlin Philharmonic who were present for the recording sessions.
Last night I listened to the Ninth from the CD box set, and was struck with what a good job of mastering was done for that release. The music really propelled with a sense of dynamism and rhythm, gathering steam as it went. The final track shows both the voices and the orchestra to advantage, with little congestion in the loud and busy passages.
I compared the stereo and multi-channel audio of the SACD and found, to my surprise, that some different takes are incorporated into the multi-channel audio. The engineer, Gernot von Schultzendorff, obviously had access to multiple master tapes, and for the multi-channel chose what could best be adapted for that format. Listen to the beginning of the second movement on both stereo and mch, and you will see what I mean. The stereo goes TOOT-toot, TOOT-ta-toot, TOOT-toot-toot. The mch goes TOOT-ta-toot, TOOT-ta-toot, TOOT-toot-toot. These are different takes, and the mch is more faithful to the score.
What this tells us is that the mch is not just an electronically dispersed version of the stereo, but a remix with access to good, even better source materials.
I note that the reviewers on this site panned the disc, with 3.5 stars for performance (quite a lower estimation than the 4.5 stars on Amazon), and only 2.5 stars for sonics. Only one of the reviewers explicitly referred to the mch sound, and his review was higher. The principal objection was that the sound volume was set low for the release, but when turned up a bit the speaker separation on the mch is quite delicate and sublime.
I will be posting these comments on the page for the SACD release, but I thought I should put them here too for people who are interested in BD-A as such. If the SACD was volumed low, the BD-A is volumed much higher. The result is less sublime, more garish. In checking the beginning of the second movement, which is my reference point for all Beethoven's Ninths, I find that the BD-A matches the stereo tracks of the SACD. In other words, it represents the less successful of the two mixes on the SACD. Someone who listens in mch will want the SACD; someone who listens in stereo may find the CD, stereo SACD and BD-A options each having their own qualities. I find the CD fine, the SACD stereo not that much better, and the BD-A an awkward disappointment. If this is the way Universal engineers today are treating one of the great Beethoven Ninths of all time, what likelihood is there that they will know what to do with the other titles expected to come through the chute?

Was this review helpful to you?  yes | no